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Victim Advice

If you are being targeted by bullies

  • Remember It’s not about you: That may sometimes feel hard to believe, but it’s true.
  • Often people who bully other people do it to make themselves feel better, because they are unhappy, at school or at home.
  • Remember that they have the problem not you. Don’t believe what they say to you, and don't blame yourself.

What should i do?

  • Act as confident as you can.
  • Face them and tell them clearly to stop.
  • Try and be calm and move away from them.
  • Telling them clearly and publically to stop, means they cannot say later that it was ‘only a joke’ or they didn’t know you were unhappy.
  • Do NOT hit out! If someone is bullying you don't try to hit/kick them.
  • You may get hurt in a fight and even if you don't, the bully can sometimes use how you hit them against you, and make it seem like you are the bully.
  • You may have no choice but to defend yourself if they are physically attacking but even then do your best to walk away, as get-ting into a fight can be used against you.
  • If they call you names: It can be hard but if they tease you or slag you off, try and laugh it off. Don’t let them see that they have hurt you.
  • Bullies like to get a reaction, it’s what they thrive off of, if they don't get one there is no point in bullying you.

Tell your friends/people you trust in class:

  1. Tell them what is going on and how you feel.
  2. Ask them to witness what is going on (especially if people are making gestures or other actions that teachers may not catch).
  3. Ask them to come with you to tell a teacher if you are afraid. Ask them to stand up with you against the bully.
  4. There is safety in numbers, and the more voices raised the more notice will be taken. 

Tell Someone! If you’re being bullied, try and tell someone about it, be it...

  •  Your parents

  • Some in your family

  • Your teachers

  • Your schools' guidance counsellor

  • A helpline

If your school has a peer mediation or mentoring program try to use it. No one can help you if you don't tell them.

You can always speak to your schools' guidance counsellor about how you are feeling and what you have experienced in a safe space. 

If you are afraid to tell because it might make things worse, tell the person you talk to that you are afraid if they do any-thing it might make it worse, ask them to find a way to help you deal with it so it won’t.

What to say when you tell: 

  1. Tell them what has happened

  2. Who is doing it

  3. How often it has happened

  4. Did anyone see or hear what went on

  5. What you have tried to do about it 

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